Tony Fernandez

Tony Fernández

Star
WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW HIM:
The most anticipated shortstop prospect of the 1990s was Alex Rodriguez. The most anticipated shortstop prospect of the 1980s was Tony Fernandez, a long-legged, side-armer who won four Gold Gloves for Toronto. Fernandez was from the Dominican Republic, which had produced the Alou brothers, Rico Carty, and Cesar Cedeno. According to legend, at a baseball clinic in their native country, a skinny 15-year old Fernandez told fellow Dominican Alfredo Griffin that some day he would take his job. At the time, Griffin was a young shortstop for the Indians. A few years later, Fernandez replaced Griffin as shortstop for the Blue Jays. Fernandez was high-waisted with big feet, which made him look clumsy. But he was fluid and intuitive on defense, and his throwing arm was very strong. He had a habit of throwing the ball across the infield side-arm or underhand. He won Gold Gloves from 1986 to 1989, and surprised the Jays by hitting .294 over that stretch. The report on Tony was that he would be an A+ fielder, but struggle with the bat. At the 1990 winter meetings, Toronto GM Pat Gillick saw a chance to infuse new talent into his team and jumped at the opportunity to grab Roberto Alomar and Joe Carter. But the price tag was Fernandez and Fred McGriff. The trade worked: within two years the Jays were on their way to back-to-back titles. Gillick always regretted dealing Tony, and he got his man back in 1993, which allowed Fernandez to earn a ring. He batted .325 in the postseason in his return to Canada, and later played in the World Series as a member of the 1997 Indians, batting .471 in the Fall Classic.

primary position

Shortstop

primary team

Blue Jays

playing career

1983—2001

nickname

Cabeza, El Fantasma

Born

June 30, 1962, in San Pedro de Macoris, San Pedro de Macoris, D.R.

died

February 16, 2020, in Weston, FL, USA

bats / throws

Both / Right

height / weight

6-2 / 165
Average HOF SS
Hitting
60
Power
40
Running
60
Fielding
70
Throwing
70
*The Scouting Grades are based on performance in the Major Leagues, not predictive skills typically placed on prospects.
SCOUTING SCALE
80 = Elite
70 = Excellent
60 = Above Average
50 = MLB Average
40 = Below Average
30 = Inferior
20 = Poor
Replaced
UNIFORM NUMBER
#1
BATTING ORDER
1
MAJOR LEAGUE DEBUT
9-2-1983
FINAL GAME
10-7-2001
CAREER AGE
21-39
MEMBER OF WORLD CHAMPIONS
1992
WAR
Win Shares

WAR

45.3

career value

WAR7

30.4

long peak

WAR5C

23.2

prime

WAR3

14.5

short peak
Average HOF SS

65.9

Career Wins Above Replacement
Average HOF SS

42.1

war in best 7 seasons
Average HOF SS

29.8

war in best 5 consecutive
Average HOF SS

21.3

WAR in best 3 seasons

WIN SHARES

267.1

career value

WIN shares 7

153.9

long peak

Win SHares 5C

112.9

prime

Win SHares 3

71.1

short peak
Average HOF SS

327.4

Career Win Shares
Average HOF SS

189.4

Win SHares In best 7 seasons
Average HOF SS

133.0

Win shares in best 5 consecutive
Average HOF SS

92.3

Win Shares in best 3 seasons

Position

#37

Shortstop

ERA AT HIS POSITION

#6

1983—2001

All-Time

#284

POsition Players
#24
BILL JAMES POSITION
UNRANKED
BILL JAMES TOP 100
#34
HALL OF STATS POSITION
UNRANKED
JOE POSNANSKI TOP 100
#35
JAWS POSITION
UNRANKED
JAWS TOP 100
.288
Batting Average
.347
On-Base Percentage
.399
Slugging Percentage
7
home runs per season
18
Stolen Bases per season